Eurozone

Half time review

Hungary is now in the depths of its presidential term. I decided to point out some of my reflections on the issue, but I would also ask you to do exactly the same by posting a comment. I wonder how Europeans judge the first-ever Hungarian EU-presidency.

The everyday routine of the European (public) administration seems to be running at full speed, without any obstacles that the presidency couldn’t overcome.

But one of the heaviest issues that marks the most the job of the rotating president is how they could manage the political difficulties: Hungarians successfully survived the hellfire caused by the national media law, as well as the historical presidency rug. Thus, governing party Fidesz gained – or might better to say: kept – much of the national support in Hungary.

For two days it looked like the presidency was stunned by the Franco-German pact of competitiveness, and the unexpectedly emerging chance to grab the (newer) trump in the politics of the EU seemed to fade away, when Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán got at the cutting edge of the European opposition. That can be qualified as success too.

What’s more, the agreement on the Euro Plus Pact is put across a deal, with Hungarian mediation, which is considered one of the most important achievements of the presidency – dispite the jar on the tax harmonisation.

It’s still way too early to assess the achievements concerning many of the Hungarian presidential objetives, although there’s a progress in the field of the future CAP regulations. Despite the fact that the accession talks of Croatia and the enlargement of the Schenge area (presidential objectives too) seem to be at the halt, overall, I think the presidency has successfully been dealing with its tasks.

What do you think about the Hungarian presidency? Now, it’s your turn to express your views! (If many of them heap up, I might cover them in a different article later on.)

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